Viewing entries tagged
Stinson Municipal Airport

Ribbon Cutting

RibbonCutting.jpg

I know I’ve posted a lot about the Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower project over the past several years so I’m not going do it again here other to say that the FAA has taken control control over its operation. The official ribbon cutting ceremony was this week and it was a fine ceremony that featured an all-female mariachi band and a cake that featured the image of the tower design.

It also featured some very large scissors.

There was this one woman who was apparently the keeper of the scissors. She was more than a little intimidating, but I understand the need for there to be a dedicated person to keep hold of such things. Oversized ceremonial scissors are expensive.

The Professional

Dror.jpg

I’d like to think of myself as a respectable photographer: I’m able to grab some pretty good shots of my kids and there was that book that was full of photos I had taken of courthouses. But there is an order of magnitude difference between what I can do and what a real “professional” architectural photographer can with the same building.

I first met Dror Baldinger when we both served on a committee for the Texas Society of Architects. Dror was trained and work for decades as an architect before switching gears and photographing buildings other people had done. His work is amazing and I feel a little guilty hiring him to photograph my modest projects.

He shot the Ranch Dining Pavilion a few years ago and I’m having him photograph the Stinson Tower project as well. I’m not saying he make projects look better than they do in real life, but he does a great job of putting the work that architects do in their best possible light.

You can look forward to seeing the results of my little adventure with Dror in the coming weeks.

Spreading Wings

StinsonSignage.jpg

As the new control tower at Stinson Municipal Airport nears completion the grounds around the historic airport will be receiving some new signage. The design of this signage isn't ours but it reflects by our design for the illuminated wings for the tower.

Our wings were inspired by the forms and construction techniques of World War I-era aircraft - the same kind of aircraft that were flown in and out of Stinson in its early years. What we like about the new signage is that it ties together the facilities on the north side of the airport with the new control tower on the south side.

It's cool to have the opportunity to do good work. It's even better to know that your work is helping other people to do good work, too.

We do "Tower Enhancements"

StinsonPlaque.jpg

Back in 2015 our proposal for how to "improve" the existing control tower design was selected as the winner of a design competition. Three years later the project is nearing completion and we were recently shown a sample of what the bronze plaque will look like next to the tower's main entrance. HiWorks along with Wrok5hop are listed as being responsible for the "Tower Enhancement Design". 

Of course this being a secure FAA facility no one is ever really going to see the plaque, but we'll know it's there. 

As Promised

SSFbuilt.jpg

As you've probably seen in recent posts our portion of the Stinson Municipal Airport Tower project suddenly materialized last week. The "wings" we had designed along with Work5hop were manufactured in Arizona and last week they were shipped to San Antonio where all eight panels were then lifted into place.

Architecture takes a long time. In many ways this project was no different: we won the "design improvements" competition back in 2015, we completed our portion of the design documents in 2016 and construction on the tower itself didn't begin until 2017. That said our portion of the project really materialized over the course of only a few days. Normally the transformation from rendering to reality does not happen so quickly. There's still work to be done: the cables that secure the wings to the tower need to be tightened and the lighting inside the wings still needs to be calibrated and scheduled. But man, we're close. 

And the renderings that we produced years ago were pretty close, too:

The original rendering for the new Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower

The original rendering for the new Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower

This Poster Is Not For Sale

SSFposter16x9.jpg

My Facebook feed contains a pretty diverse collection of posts. From friends who seem to constantly be on vacation to Russian trolls there are lots of things vying for my attention. One ad that caught my eye the other day was for a company that sells posters featuring the control towers of various airports from around the world. Of course I checked to see if they had one for Stinson Municipal Airport. They did not but since we have something to do with that particular project I thought I'd suggest an additional print be offered for sale. Please see above.

I realize there have been a number of Stinson blog posts in the last few weeks and I promise to return to my usual collection of random posts here in the coming weeks.

Stinson Hat

STcabLift04.jpg

A few weeks ago I wrote about the progress of the new Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower. As the main portion of the tower was going up the "cab" - the uppermost part with all the windows where the air traffic controllers actually do all their work - was simultaneously being built on the ground. Last week a large crane lifted it to its final resting place on top of the tower.

This is not how buildings are normally built. Then again an air traffic control tower is not a normal type of building. When you think about it, this approach makes sense. Since the cab contains the majority of the detail work associated with the project you want to build it in the most efficient way possible. Forcing every sub-contractors to climb ten flights of stairs to do all their work a hundred feet in the air isn't very efficient. Hoisting a massive pre-built component may seem like an extreme approach but it turns out to be the best one. AJT, the engineering firm responsible for the main portion of the tower, has perfected this approach having built several multiple versions of the same tower over the years.

Design is about the finished product to be sure, but it is also about how you get there. Strategizing how the "wings" - our contribution to the design - are prebuilt and attached to the tower represented a significant portion of our design as well.

Stinson Rising

StinsonRising.jpg

Construction of the new Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower is currently underway. So far the effort has focused on the concrete tower (the part not designed HiWorks in conjunction with Work5hop) but in a few months our portion of the design will be attached to that central core. These prefabricated "wings" are currently being assembled in Phoenix and the full-scale mockup looks great.

So stay tuned - things are about to get interesting.

Tilting Up

image courtesy AJT Engineering

image courtesy AJT Engineering

I mentioned back in September work had begun on the Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower. That work continues and I am happy to follow up by saying that the building is now officially out of the ground.

The main body of the tower (designed by AJT Engineering) consists of a series of stacked precast concrete panels. These are cast at a plant east of town, shipped to the site and then hoisted by a crane into place. This type of construction isn't particularly unusual - many "big box" retail stores and warehouses are built with precast panels as well - but the technique is remarkable in that you go from a foundation to something that resembles a building in a remarkably short period of time.

There is still lots of work to go on the project (the "wings" we designed along with Work5hop are just beginning to be fabricated in Arizona) but it's always exciting to see a design starting to become real.

To Build Up You Start By Building Down

StinsonHole

The Stinson Municipal Airport Control Tower is officially under construction. I can't say it's "out of the ground" yet as it's still technically a hole in the ground. But it's getting there.

For the record it's been almost two years HiWorks along with Work5hop designed the winning submission for the competition to propose "design improvements" to the original tower design by AJT Engineering. Architecture is not career for those desiring instant gratification.

At any rate, the "wings" of our design are being manufactured by International Tensile Structures in Phoenix, Arizona and we'll be making a trip out there this fall to see how work on those structures is proceeding. The tower itself is scheduled to be operational next year.

Breaking Ground

Last week we attended the official groundbreaking of the new air traffic control tower at Stinson Municipal Airport. As you may recall, back in 2015 HiWorks and Work5hop collaborated to enter a design competition for "improvements" to an already-designed air traffic control tower at Stinson Municipal Airport. We won and over the last year we have been working with AJT Engineering to finalize the design. That design was put out for bid, a contractor was selected and last Wednesday a groundbreaking ceremony was held.

In front of the airport's existing tower a ceremonial pile of dirt was prepared with an appropriate number of ceremonial shovels (see above). A cake was baked and Fiesta medals were distributed. When the ceremony was over the contractor removed the pile of dirt and began work at the actual site of the tower, some 2,100 feet to the southwest.

A New Tower For Stinson

In theory, this is what the new tower at Stinson Municipal Airport is going to look like.

People often ask us, "What kind of architecture do you do? Houses? Schools? Office buildings? Retail?" To that question we always answer, "Yes."

Airport infrastructure? Yeah, we do that, too.

Earlier this week we learned that our proposal for a new air traffic control tower had been been declared the winner in a completion sponsored by the City of San Antonio and the San Antonio AIA. For this effort we collaborated with Work5hop and together developed a proposal that will create a functional landmark that pays homage to the unique history of the site.

Stinson Municipal Airport played an important role in the early days of flight. In addition to being a training site for World War I pilots, “Stinson Field” was also the home of the first woman-operated flying school in the nation. This rich heritage is what is referenced in the proposed "design enhancements" - an engineering firm had already designed the main portion of the tower and the competition was held to devise ways to improve it.

Our proposal calls for a steel armature to be attached to the precast concrete panels of the original tower design. The form and articulation of this secondary structure references the construction of early aircraft and their fabric-clad skin. As the site of the tower is 2,000 feet from the terminal, the enhancements are intended to be legible from a great distance. During the day the fabric-clad airfoil shapes, steel cables and struts read as abstracted interpretations of biplane wings. At night, these wings glow with internal LED illumination. All this occurs below the level of the control tower cab so as to not interfere with its FAA-mandated function.