Viewing entries tagged
Houston

"The Works" gets aggregated

WhataburgerChronicle.jpg

Back in July of 2016 I released an episode of "The Works" about the development of the Whataburger A-Frame. It was a fascinating story I was trying to tell and I also ended up doing a written version of the story for the Rivard Report

This week I learned the Houston Chronicle picked up the story and published a piece of their own based on my podcast and article. I have to admit I was flattered to have found my way into the nation's third-largest newspaper. I was also flattered to be referred to as a "scholar".

Of course I would have been happy to have been interviewed by the writer of the piece in the Chronicle but he never reached out to me. That's why I didn't know anything about it until a year-and-a-half after it was published.

Anyway, you can listen to the original podcast episode here or read the Houston Chronicle story here

Will the sea swallow Houston?

image courtesy the Rice Design Alliance

That was the question Erica Goranson and I answered in our Houston Ark competition entry from last year. Erica and I were having some fun creating some architectural science fiction based on a frighteningly real potential future scenario. At any rate, we recently saw that Raj Mankad, editor of Cite Magazine referenced the entry as a way of introducing an essay on how rising sea levels will impact Houston. We were thrilled to see our work used to introduce more serious scholarship on the topic.

 

We're #2

rendering by Erica Goranson

A few months a go my good friend (and former Lake|Flato colleague) Erica Goranson and I heard of a competition sponsored by The Architect's Newspaper to repurpose the now-abandoned Houston Astrodome.  We developed a concept where a hull structure would be built under the existing structure to create a seaworthy vessel capable of protecting and transporting the accumulated cultural resources of the city of Houston in a future scenario where rising sea levels required the costal city to be abandoned.  We won second place.

 

A recently rejected bond initiative that would have funded renovations to the structure means that the eighth wonder of the world will most likely be demolished, eliminating the possibility of our future scenario.